North Korean reporters can only use fax to cover Incheon Games

September 15, 2014
At  the Asian Games press center in Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, North Korean reporters are being informed that they are blocked from accessing a North Korean website. Due to South Korea's National Security Law, the reporters have to send their reports to Pyongyang via fax machine.  (Yonhap)

At the Asian Games press center in Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, North Korean reporters are being informed that they are blocked from accessing North Korean websites. Due to South Korea’s National Security Law, the reporters have to send their reports to Pyongyang via fax machine. (Yonhap)

North Korean site

The National Security Law (NSL) bans access to North Korean websites. (Yonhap)

By Kim Jae-heun

North Korean reporters covering the Incheon Asian Games will rely on a rather antiquated piece of technology — the fax machine — to send their stories to Pyongyang.

The National Security Law (NSL) bans access to North Korean websites; and for the reporters, this makes it impossible to file their stories via the Internet.

A Ministry of Unification official confirmed Monday that the North reporters would not get special access to North Korean websites such as that of the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), and that both countries were aware of the situation.

“It’s common knowledge that North Korean websites are not accessible in the South. We’ve notified the North about the situation and they are aware of it,” an official told The Korea Times on condition of anonymity.

“We agreed on the fax machine as the system for the North Korean reporters to deliver their articles. As far as I know, the North delegation hasn’t officially requested a change.”

Pyongyang is sending a 273-person delegation to Incheon which will include athletes, officials and reporters.

While the event is seen as an opportunity to warm relations, Seoul and Pyongyang butted heads over issues such as which side would pay for the North’s cheerleading squad to make the trip. Pyongyang eventually decided against sending the cheerleaders.

Earlier reports said that the reporters had attempted to access North Korean sites, including that of the KCNA and Uriminzokkiri, a website that carries KCNA reports, at the press center in Incheon on Friday.

An official from the Incheon Asian Game Organizing Committee (IAGOC) said he was unable to comment on the matter, citing the NSL.

However, he added that the North Koreans had requested use of WiFi in their hotel rooms.

While the Internet is mostly prohibited in the North, some elite members of society are reportedly allowed access.

Enforced in 1948, the NSL sought to protect the country in the run-up to the Korean War, making illegal both communism and the recognition of North Korea as a political entity.

moose knuckles pas cher moose knuckles pas cher moose knuckles pas cher moose knuckles pas cher moose knuckles pas cher moose knuckles outlet moose knuckles outlet moose knuckles outlet moose knuckles outlet moose knuckles outlet maillot de foot pas cher maillot de foot pas cher maillot de foot pas cher maillot de foot pas cher maillot de foot pas cher scarpe nike air max outlet scarpe nike air max outlet scarpe nike air max outlet scarpe nike air max outlet scarpe nike air max outlet scarpe nike air max outlet nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher nike tn pas cher air max pas cher air max pas cher stone island outlet stone island outlet stone island outlet stone island outlet stone island outlet stone island outlet barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher barbour pas cher nike tn squalo nike air max outlet mcm outlet online moose knuckles outlet happiness outlet happiness outlet shoes